LedByLucyTheClothesHorse1

Interview with Fashion Blogger: The Clothes Horse

There are so many different kinds of fashion blogs. At one end of the scale are those that share their daily rants and raves from their bedrooms, accompanied by iPhone snaps with #NoFilter realness. Then at the opposite end of the scale is Rebecca’s blog, The Clothes Horse. Her ethereal posts are carefully curated using the woodlands and beaches of Northern Ireland as the backdrop for her stylised photography. Scrolling through her posts is like reading a never ending fairy tale with daily doses of magic.

I caught up with Rebecca to find out about how she became the protagonist in her own online fairy-tale, what she dreamed of doing when she was growing up, the thought process that goes into creating a post and what her dream shoot would look like…

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Your photographs always seem to tell a story. Some remind me of fairy tales, others vintage fashion photography and then stylised films too. What is the process that you go through to create these looks and themes?

Part of it just happens organically. I watch a lot of old films and I read a lot growing up so these influences are still with me. Sometimes I’m just out on a walk and I see something and it’s very fairytale-esque, I don’t have to plan the image it just happens. It probably helps that I’m an American and I just moved to Northern Ireland; I see things differently than a local who drives by rock walls and castle ruins every day, for me it’s very old world and romantic while to them it’s just mundane. Being new to an area always helps, you see things more romantically than the locals and since I grew up moving every few years I’m sort of constantly in the state of being new and appreciating my surroundings because I’m not accustomed to them. If I break down the process then it usually starts with an outfit; once I have the outfit I think about what sort of settings would highlight it and then I go for a walk-I have some images in my mind but I also walk around and see what I can find. Sometimes I had a flowering bush in mind for a set and when I get there the plant died or the light is wrong, so I just walk or ride my bicycle a little farther and try to find a better fit. If I lived in a city I think my style would be completely different because I do pick out clothes thinking “this would work in the woods/countryside” or more literally I’d look at stilettos and think “where am I going to wear those?” because so many of the roads I walk along are dirt or gravel.

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What was your dream job as a 17 year old?

I wanted to be a “fine artist;” in my head that was really the dream to make a living doing art but the sort of art that belongs in museums and exhibitions. Even back then I remember my art teacher recommending that I look into illustration because she thought it suited my talents and interests more, but I felt it wasn’t as “cool” and “special” as fine art back then! Of course shortly after that my family moved and the next school I attended didn’t really have any art program so when college rolled around I was completely off the art track and trying to find a new goal! Now I’d probably love to get into illustration!

 
If you had access to an unlimited budget what would your dream shoot look like?

Oh gosh there are so many dream shoots I’d love to do. The wardrobe would probably be Valentino, the location would probably be Neuschwanstein Castle in Germany (it looks like a Disney castle), and I’d love to get some of Tim Walker’s old props out for it as well! He’s created giant moths, cameras, and monsters for some of his shoots and I’d love to borrow a few for my own pictures. That’s really the next level-finding a way to create giant props to use but I wouldn’t even know where to store them once I built them!

So if ever you are in need of a little bit of sparkle on a dull day you know where to head.

This interview originally appeared on lifestyle, fashion and travel blog LedByLucy. If you enjoyed this post then you may want to have a nosy at the People and Projectssection of LedByLucy where you will find regular interviews with inspirational women working within the creative field.

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The Crazy Response Fashion Bloggers Get When They Take a Break

Aussie fashion blogger Nicole Warne, known by her 1.3 million Instagram followers and 29.4K Twitter followers as @garypeppergirl, caused a bit of a scare for her loyal fanbase recently. Warne went off the grid for nearly two weeks — and people freaked out.

Warne’s last post before her unintentional hiatus garnered over 800 comments, ranging from curious (“Where did she go”), to concerned (“You have been missed!” and “Where have you been? Is everything okay?” and “I hope you have a well deserved break love, and get well soon, we all miss you!”), to a little confrontational (“She is killlllin me.” and “Why aren’t you posting on Instagram anymore?”).

“WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN? IS EVERYTHING OKAY?”

– FASHIONISTA_TRAVELER

Wrote Warne on her “Hi, I’m alive” Instagram post on Monday, “This is easily the first time in my life I’ve ever taken such a long break from Instagram and I didn’t realize it would have so many of my friends, family, and all of you concerned. It was not intentional, so please know there’s nothing to worry about.”

The reason for Warne’s brief social media break was a gig as “creative director for a covetable commercial campaign.” “It’s consuming all of my focus and energy, so despite the stress/pressure, I’m incredibly excited to have had the work I do behind closed doors lead me to an opportunity like this,” Warne wrote. We think a vacation not spent jockeying for the perfect ‘gram shot would (or should) have also been a perfectly acceptable reason to be disconnected for a bit.

“Having to be constantly present is literally the worst thing about working in social media. I don’t really dare to research into it — ignorance is bliss! — but I’m sure it’s bad for my mental health,” blogger Zanita Whittington says. “Lately, I’ve been posting less and less on Instagram and more on the newer forms, like Snapchat and Facebook Live. I’d absolutely love to have a week or two away.”

Being a blogger has segued from the frivolous vanity project of a wannabe street style star to a viable career path. Case in point: Whittington and Warne were featured, along with The Blonde Salad’s Chiara Ferragni, on the cover of Lucky (RIP) back in February. Putting bloggers on a glossy cover was a big deal — that’s coveted real estate usually reserved for Tinseltown’s biggest stars, music heavyweights, and the occasional model. A pop star has albums to make, tours to perform, and press junkets to promote themselves; Hollywood notables have similar to-do lists, swapping in screen time for hours in the studio. Bloggers are expected to create content and interact with followers, to be continually “active” and “available” to a degree that more traditionally famous folks are not. They’re also expected to turn quiet, personal, private moments into shareable content.

For some big fashion bloggers, the omnipresence factor exists, but it’s not a problem. “WeWoreWhat is a 24/7 job, so of course there is pressure to always be ‘on’ — loving what I do definitely makes it a whole lot easier,” WeWoreWhat’s Danielle Bernstein says.

Perhaps it’s a sign that we’re entirely too tethered to our technology — and we want our must-follow social media superstars to be equally, if not more, on. Or maybe being constantly reachable, like-able, and re-‘gram-able a necessary evil of the (quite plummy) job of being a successful fashion blogger. There are much worse gripes one could have about a gig.

“When life and work gets busy, or you lose momentum and/or inspiration and can’t meet [readers’] expectations, it can feel like you’re failing…on top of that, hundreds of thousands of people are waiting for your next post — and there’s pressure that whatever you put up next better be amazing. Or at least you need a good reason for the hiatus to prove that you’re ‘really busy’ with ‘lots of meetings,’ ‘collaborations,’ and just being a goal-kicking, high-achieving entrepreneur,” says Sara Donaldson of Harper & Harley. “Sometimes, it’s just a simple fact that you would rather not be on your phone and instead, live your life in the present.” Amen to that.

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